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Category: Clinical Procedures Articles

Labor and Delivery, Normal Delivery of the Newborn ?>

Labor and Delivery, Normal Delivery of the Newborn

Labor and Delivery, Normal Delivery of the Newborn Introduction The delivery of a full-term newborn refers to delivery at a gestational age of 37-42 weeks, as determined by the last menstrual period or via ultrasonographic dating and evaluation. The Naegel rule is a commonly used formula to predict due date based on the date of the last menstrual period. This rule assumes a menstrual cycle of 28 days and mid-cycle ovulation. Ultrasonographic dating can be more accurate, especially when it…

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Drainage, Bartholin Abscess ?>

Drainage, Bartholin Abscess

Drainage, Bartholin Abscess Introduction The Bartholin glands are a pair of pea-sized, vulvovaginal, mucous-secreting vestibular glands that are located in the labia minora in the 4- and 8-o’clock positions, beneath the bulbospongiosus muscle. A Bartholin cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops in one of the Bartholin glands or ducts when the duct that drains the fluid from the gland becomes blocked and causes the duct and gland to swell. A Bartholin gland abscess develops either when a Bartholin cyst…

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Lumbar Puncture ?>

Lumbar Puncture

Lumbar Puncture Introduction Lumbar puncture is a procedure that is often performed in the emergency department to obtain information about the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).1 Although usually used for diagnostic purposes to rule out potential life-threatening conditions such as bacterial meningitis or subarachnoid hemorrhage, lumbar puncture is also sometimes performed for therapeutic reasons, such as the treatment of pseudotumor cerebri. CSF fluid analysis can also aid in the diagnosis of various other conditions, such as demyelinating diseases and carcinomatous meningitis. Lumbar…

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Bedside Ultrasonography, Lumbar Puncture ?>

Bedside Ultrasonography, Lumbar Puncture

Bedside Ultrasonography, Lumbar Puncture Introduction Lumbar puncture is a common emergency department procedure used to obtain information about the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic and, less commonly, therapeutic reasons. Please refer to the full article on Lumbar Puncture for more details on the lumbar puncture procedure. Lumbar puncture is typically performed via “blind” surface landmark guidance. The surface landmark technique is reported to be successful in a high percentage of attempted lumbar punctures; however, surface landmark identification of underlying structures…

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Splinting, Volar ?>

Splinting, Volar

Splinting, Volar Introduction In general, splints are applied to decrease movement and provide support and comfort through stabilization of an injury. Splints are primarily used to stabilize nonemergent injuries to bones until the patient can be evaluated by a consultant such as an orthopedic surgeon. Splints are also used to assist in primary healing or to temporarily immobilize an extremity prior to surgery (eg, open fracture). Unlike casts, splints are noncircumferential and often preferred in the emergency department (ED) setting,…

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Splinting, Ulnar Gutter ?>

Splinting, Ulnar Gutter

Splinting, Ulnar Gutter Introduction Splints are generally applied to decrease movement to provide support and comfort through stabilization of an injury. The primary purpose of a splint is as a temporary bridge for nonemergent injuries to bones until definitive casting can be performed by a consultant, such as an orthopedic surgeon. Splints can also serve as initial immobilization in the presurgical period or as immobilization for primary healing. All patients with injuries that are splinted should be referred for evaluation…

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Splinting, Thumb Spica ?>

Splinting, Thumb Spica

Splinting, Thumb Spica Introduction In general, splints are applied to decrease movement and provide support and comfort through stabilization of an injury. Splints are primarily used to secure nonemergent injuries to bones until they can be evaluated by a consultant such as an orthopedic surgeon. Splints are also used to temporarily immobilize an extremity prior to surgery (eg, open fracture) or to assist in primary healing. Unlike casts, splints are noncircumferential and often preferred in the emergency department setting, since…

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Splinting, Sugar-Tong Forearm ?>

Splinting, Sugar-Tong Forearm

Splinting, Sugar-Tong Forearm Introduction Splints are generally applied to decrease movement to provide support and comfort through stabilization of an injury. In the emergency department, splints are primarily used to stabilize nonemergent injuries to bones until the patient can be evaluated by a consultant such as an orthopedic surgeon, at which time definitive casting can be performed.1, 2 Splints can also serve as initial immobilization in the presurgical period or can immobilize an injury for primary healing.1 All patients with…

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Splinting, Radial Gutter ?>

Splinting, Radial Gutter

Splinting, Radial Gutter Introduction In general, splints are applied to decrease movement and provide support and comfort by stabilizing an injury. Splints are primarily used to secure nonemergent injuries to the bones and soft tissues of an extremity until it can be evaluated by a consultant such as an orthopedic surgeon. Splints can also be used to assist in primary healing or to temporarily immobilize an extremity prior to surgery (eg, open fracture). Unlike casts, splints are noncircumferential and often…

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Splinting, Posterior Elbow ?>

Splinting, Posterior Elbow

Splinting, Posterior Elbow Introduction Splints are generally applied to decrease movement to provide support and comfort through stabilization of an injury. In the emergency department (ED), splints are primarily used to stabilize nonemergent injuries to bones until the patient can be evaluated by a consultant such as an orthopedic surgeon, at which time definitive casting can be performed.1, 2 Splints can also serve as initial immobilization in the presurgical period or can immobilize an injury for primary healing. All patients…

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